Aviation (ZM)

Aviation in Zambia

Flying in Zambia - 10 years on

On the anniversary of 10 years of flying in Zambia with Flying Mission, Rick and Tracey Rempel review the growth of this work. (Rick was the second pilot to come up from Botswana to start the work of FM in another country of Southern Africa; Tracey was working with SIM when they met and married in Zambia.)

The inside story

'Let’s talk business' say Timo and Nina, as they explain their parts in connecting people in Zambia. 

Timo: Gonzaga University, USA, once a year offers a study trip into rural Zambia to the town of Zambezi and its surrounding area. The students spend three weeks in the bush, learning about the culture, the country and its people and teaching a variety of different classes from which the Zambians may profit. May was the month this year.

 

How is FMZ involved? Flying Mission Zambia is the bridge between Lusaka and Zambezi.

Where? Never Heard Of It!

When I arrive at the hangar it is dark. Today I need to take off as soon as the sun rises. I have a long day ahead of me. I am flying to Kalungu! says Andy Kradolfer, Operations Manager for Flying Mission Zambia.A couple of weeks ago Flying Mission Zambia was asked to re-open an airstrip all the way up in the north of the country. This place is in the bush, 500 miles as the crow flies (or 620 miles on the road) from the capital city, in rural Zambia.

Partnering with FLYSPEC

Flyspec. You may have read that name on these pages a few times. 

This charity partners with Flying Mission Zambia to accomplish its goal of 'bringing orthopaedic reconstructive surgery to remote areas of Zambia'. And what does that mean in real terms?

It means that 75% of Zambians living in rural areas can have access to specialist surgical services. 60% of those people live on less than £1 per day. Flyspec charges nothing for its services. It is reliant on donations. And that is how this 3 year old child with Blounts Disease came to be succesfully treated.

The value of TEAM

One day at team meeting, Andy Kradolpher, Aviation Manager of Flying Mission Zambia, reminded the team

'You are all part of bringing the truth, the Gospel of Jesus Christ, the message that sets people free.

On the last two days of my recent flight to Malawi,  I realized what a crucial role the aeroplane plays here in Africa to help further the spread of the Good News.

We only have a limited time on this earth, and the plane helps in maximizing the impact in this region.

It was only possible to do that trip because

Another pilot, another flight to Malawi

Andy Kradolfer, head of Aviation for Flying Mission Zambia, found it was his turn to fly to Malawi recently. His brief was to take a Zambian pastor to speak for 2 days at a week-long Missions Conference. Andy thought that this pastor must be very important to be flying alone for such a long way only to speak for 2 days.

Well, things didn’t go well initially. There is more to be done for international flights than domestic ones. Andy told us:

A man for all seasons

Mary-Ann lets us into some of the ways her Flying Mission pilot husband, Guillermo Reddekopp gets 'stuck into' his job in Zambia: 

'Guillermo enjoys all his roles within FMZ, but his main role is to be a pilot, serving the mission/church community in Zambia and Southern Africa area. 

 

What do you do all day?

 

On weekdays, on most Saturdays, and occasionally on a Sunday, there is activity in and around the Flying Mission Zambia hangar. From Monday to Friday there are a number of guys who arrive at 7:15am.

By 7:30am there is a 'devotional time' which all those working that day at the hangar will attend. The guys have been going through “My Utmost for His Highest” by Oswald Chambers which has been really encouraging, if sometimes a little bit heavy at that hour of the morning! From thereon, daily tasks are discussed and assigned. 

An AHA moment

It seems like Malawi is the place to go right now! Three weeks after Flying Mission Zambia pilot Timo took a group there, another of our pilots, Guillermo, also flew a group of people from Willow Creek Church in Chicago, USA, to a village in rural Northern Malawi.

Timo goes over the border

Flying Mission pilot Timo Kehr tells us how he is finding mission flying in this report of a flight to Malawi he recently undertook. He dubs it 'a short insight into the life of a missionary pilot': 

6 am: the alarm clock goes off. Take off is set for 8 am, so I have a small breakfast and off I go…Thank God, the internet is working - what a great start to the day!

First of all: weather check; clouds are low but otherwise no threat. " Good to go".

Next step: checking the plane: fuel, oil; all is functioning and everything is where it’s meant to be…

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